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Exactly!!!!! Let go trying to manipulate and trying to make happen trust…. @doreenvirtue with @repostapp. ・・・ Remember the message from this week’s oracle card reading video: ride the current wave of energy, and don’t fight against it. For the next 24 hours especially, go with the flow and trust that it is sending you in the right direction. Breathe and pray to release any impulses to control. Keep letting go and letting God and your Higher Self be in charge. Today’s energy will be enjoyable and motivating when you treat it like a tailwind that’s pushing you to go higher. It’s a good day to go for gold, provided that it easily flows. From the Magical Messages From the Fairies Oracle Cards app

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A beluga whale named Nanuq died Thursday at SeaWorld Orlando. His cause of death is still unknown, and autopsy results won’t be available for another six to eight weeks, the company said on its Facebook page Friday. Nanuq, who was thought to be 31 or 32 years old, was on long-term loan from the Vancouver Aquarium, the Orlando Sentinel reported. He had been at SeaWorld San Diego until he was sent to Orlando as part of the park’s breeding program.”While the cause of death is not yet known, Nanuq was being treated by SeaWorld veterinarians for an infection associated with a fractured jaw; an injury that resulted from an interaction between two animals that were part of a compatible social group,” the company wrote on its Facebook page. Animal Welfare Institute marine mammal scientist Naomi Rose, a noted critic of SeaWorld, told the Orlando Sentinel that such an injury would be unlikely in the wild. “If he died because of something related to that infection he got related to the broken jaw,” she said, “then he died of being in captivity.” SeaWorld referred to Nanuq as an “older whale,” and cited studies from the Journal of Cetacean Research and Management that put the average life span of a beluga whale between 30 and 35 years. Rose told the Sentinel that scientists are still debating beluga life spans. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, belugas in the wild live anywhere from 35 to 50 years. Nanuq’s death is yet another blow to SeaWorld, which has been struggling since the 2013 film “Blackfish” launched a wave of criticism surrounding the company’s marine mammal captivity program. SeaWorld’s CEO Jim Atchison stepped down in December amid falling stock prices and weakened ticket sales, and a permanent replacement has not yet been announced. In the meantime, Chairman David D’Alessandro has taken over as interim CEO, and, in February, SeaWorld promoted company veteran Daniel Brown to oversee its 11 parks.

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It’s been nearly five years since the Oscar-winning documentary “The Cove” put the international spotlight on Taiji, Japan, a town that slaughters thousands of dolphins every year. But despite outrage and a wave of backlash against Japan for condoning the behavior, little has changed. In fact, on Monday a large pod of some 50 to 60 dolphins, including calves, was driven into the cove and slaughtered by fishermen. While politicians like Caroline Kennedy, U.S. ambassador to Japan, have spoken out against the annual hunt, Japan set a quota of 1,938 dolphins and whales for this year alone. More recently, Japanese singer and activist Yoko Ono added her name to a growing list of celebrities calling for an end to the hunt. As has been reported before, the real motivation behind the hunt is the money that buyers will pay for captive dolphins destined for marine parks. According to trade documents, a single trained dolphin can earn upwards of $40,000. While some of the animals caught in the cove are sold to parks, the majority are slaughtered for their meat — despite government warnings that it contains dangerously high levels of mercury. Rare dolphins are especially valuable — and this year it’s more evident than ever. Fishermen have already caught two albino dolphins, adding to the one albino calf they caught last year. While this year’s pair swims in their sea pens in the cove, last year’s calf is still in a tank at the nearby Taiji Whale Museum. While the slaughter goes on, there are several groups that are working to save Japan’s dolphins.

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