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My local zoo’s Wildlife Awareness Movement youth group posted this saying it was a very good article, etc. Are you kidding me? They’re trying to endorse SeaWorld? Turned orcas into “friendly and lovable creatures?” They’re predators whether you like it or not. Why do you think that they’ve killed their trainers? Orcas often swim miles and miles a day, and they’re put in small pools that aren’t habitable at all! SeaWorld tricked people into believing orcas live short lives when they are only that short in captivity. Yes, we need to work on sustaining their natural environment, but we do NOT solve that by putting them in small pools and performing tricks for the public! Idiots. I was VERY surprised they posted this. It disgusted me.

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@neonwilde with @repostapp. ・・・ Lolita is the biggest “attraction” at Miami Seaquarium and has long been the subject of animal rights protests. She was captured in 1970 off the Washington state coast from an orca pod listed as endangered. That made Lolita endangered as well, according to the federal government, but a recent lawsuit is fighting the fact that the conditions of her captivity in a relatively small tank are illegal under U.S. law. The lawsuit, filed in Miami federal court by @officialpeta and other groups, contends Lolita should ultimately be removed to a sea pen under a retirement plan that would more closely mimic her natural Pacific Ocean environment.

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This is a perfect example of what is going on in at where they are holding 4 dolphins in a very small pool filled with chlorine, facing the ocean (their natural habitat) in which they were abducted from, all for the entertainment of tourists. We are fighting hard and speaking up for these dolphins and all others held in captivity. The top ways we can make an impact in the long run are 1. Spread awareness and educate on why captivity is wrong so that tourists will stop joining these tourist activities and eventually when the demand is gone they will stop. 2. Boycott this hotel and threaten their business to be severely damaged due to their cruelty to animals. If the hotel fears loss of too much income, they will give the people what they want. In the mean time, let’s hope we can get a professional out there to overlook the dolphins and their conditions to show that the treatment is NOT humane (as the hotel manager claims) and then help to make the next step based on the health of the dolphins and what is best for them. These are getting a lot of attention but remember similar bad treatment to Dolphins happens all over the world especially tropical tourist destinations (I.e. Cabo San Lucas, Mexico) and even huge corporations like @seaworld. Be aware and remember it is NOT EVER okay for a wild animal to be placed in captivity to be raised by humans unless they already come from unfortunate circumstances where they are un able to survive in their natural habitat. We SHARE this planet with every being, we do not own animals or this planet.

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Education on orcas dorsal fins; A male killer whale’s dorsal fin can grow to as much as 6 feet tall. Despite the fact that the dorsal fin is very straight, it is not supported by bone, but a fibrous connective tissue called collagen. A wild orca often travels far, and quickly, in deep water. The water provides pressure to the fin, keeping the tissues inside healthy and straight, and encouraging the dorsal fin to remain straight. That said, it is not impossible for a wild orca’s dorsal fin to collapse or become bent. A study in 1998 of killer whales in New Zealand showed a relatively high rate (23%) of collapsing, collapsed, or even bent or wavy dorsal fins, and noted that this was higher than that observed in populations in British Columbia or Norway. Researchers have theorized that dorsal fin collapse in wild whales may be due to age, stress or altercations with other killer whales. In captivity, dorsal fin collapse may be related to several factors, including time spent at the water surface, swimming in the same direction in a relatively small pool. The tissue in the dorsal fin gets less of a workout, and less support in the water than it would in a wild whale, and starts to fall over. The same thing can happen to the whale’s tail flukes, which often flop over at the ends. Other causes may be dehydration due to warmer water and air temperatures, stress or age. Information found on http://marinelife.about.com/od/marinelife101/f/killerwhaledorsalfincollapse.htm

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“I Will Take Their Place” I will take the place of all the animals that are used, abuse, exploited, tested on, ripped away from their families, locked in enclosures that are far to small, hunted, tortured, and used for our entertainment. To many, this is a bold statement that would never have any action behind it. Not for me. Empty your tanks SeaWorld, I will take your Orcas and Dolphins places. Retire your Elephants circuses, I will take their place. Release your Horses, carriages, I will take their place. Let loose your Rabbits, Mice, Primates, Cats, and Dogs laboratories, I will take their places. If it is cruel, harmful, painful, or illegal to do to a human, why would you do it to another living creature? When I look into another animals eyes, I do not see anything different. I see a creature capable of love, understanding, intelligence, emotion. I see a soul. They are no different than me, and therefore, I will take their place so they may have the freedom I have taken for granted. @officialpeta @emptythetanksworldwide

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CONTINUED IN COMMENTS In the wild orcas are almost constantly on the move, even when resting orcas will often continue to swim very slowly (2 knots or less). In captivity they have to change their lifestyle, they have barriers they must avoid so must swim in tight circular motions and must get used to spending long periods of time motionless resting on the surface. When born into captivity calves struggle with this, they’re hardwired to move constantly and cannot perform the tight circular motions required to keep from banging into the sides of the tank. As a result, until the calf learns to rest and avoid the walls of the tank in this unnatural environment, mother orcas have to constantly be on the move for the first few days of the calf’s life, placing themselves between the calf and the walls of the tank. This is incredibly tiring and hard for them. In Corky’s case it may have contributed to the deaths of many of her calves, including Spooky. lived with her mate in a small tank at he impregnated her and she gave birth to on Halloween 1978. Corky spent so much time trying to guide Spooky away from the walls of the tank she was unable to master feeding him, as a result he mistook her eye patch for her mammary glands and tried to suckle from her eye. Corky had also been removed from her mother when she was a calf herself so she had never been taught how to nurse a calf. After a few days of unsuccessful feeding the decision was made to move Spooky to a separate tank where he could be monitored more closely and fed by the trainers.

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